Tag Archives: weird animals

Electric Eel vs. Alligator (Caiman)

So who would win a battle between an electric eel and an alligator?

Well, actually a smart alligator would leave an electric eel all alone.

Nature provides all sorts of defenses – poison, camouflage, big brains combined with opposable thumbs. For the eel, it’s a shock of electricity that can save its life from a predator.

Here’s visual evidence of an entanglement between the two captured by a Brazilian fisherman.

The eel’s effort was more successful than this python which tried to eat an alligator.

Photo credit for arm-raising alligator – Funny Junk

Meth Lab

3 out of four dogs recommend you stay off drugs.

Snake Foot

What’s more rare than hen’s teeth?

How about a snake leg?

Oh, wait. They found a snake with one leg and a clawed foot in China.

The woman who found it in her home beat it to death, but preserved the body.

Freaky stuff.

The Telegraph has the whole story of the legged snake.

Photo: CEN/Europics

Wobbly the Dancing Squirrel

It’s Wobbly the Dancing Squirrel.

Actually, though, I believe it’s Wobbly the Squirrel with Parkinson’s Disease. Can squirrels get Parkinson’s?

This just doesn’t look normal to me.

Maybe he’s been eating fermented fruit like the drunk squirrel I posted another time.

Freaky Sheep

One of my readers here at the Squirrel Queen’s abode is aware of the fascination with the bizarre that causes me to post things like anatomically correct knitting and time-warped album covers.

He gave me the heads up (thanks David) and left a link on my About Page (which I highly recommend that everyone should read so they know all the pertinent info on why I tick the way I do).

David’s link directed me to one of those uncommon freaks of nature –  a five-legged lamb.

The Australian sheep has a small leg dangling from the back of its neck that should remind Newscoma of one of her all-time favorite bad movies Basket Case.

Not only does it have an extra leg, its extra leg has an extra hoof. That’s right. One sheep = five legs, six feet.

The wooly one appears to be doing fine and is just another sheep in its flock.

Here’s the visual evidence.

Humanzee – Oliver the Chimp

So the dogs woke me up at 3:45 a.m. to go out for a urinary jaunt.

Upon opening the door and getting a face full of cold air as I let them out and back in, I was immediately wide awake.

Trying to find something on the TV to knock me back out again, I watched the end of a MacGyver episode. (For the big finale, he used two silver candlesticks wrapped in bare wires to conduct electricity and defibrillated a man’s heart to bring him back to life. So what did you do at work today? Top that.)

When the mulleted magician was done, I was still wide awake. Surfing the channels, I found a show on the grid entitled “Humanzee” on the Science network. I thought to myself, that will do the trick. I’ll be conked out in 8 minutes.

Instead I was fascinated by the story of this chimpanzee brought from Africa in 1960. It turned out to act differently from all other chimps. Oliver preferred to walk upright. His cranial features were more humanoid than the average Zippy the Chimp. The animal trainers it lived with said it was capable of doing tasks and that other chimps shunned it.

Strange indeed.

At around the age of 16, Oliver’s libido took over and resulted in his being sold by his original owners, beginning an odyssey around the globe. There was talk that Oliver was a hybrid between a chimp and a human.

I still can’t believe I fell back to sleep with this animal mystery on the TV screen, but I did.

So, thanks to Youtube, I tracked down the rest of the episode in six parts.

Here is the first of the videos, so you can see why I wanted to know more.

Oliver image, MacGyver Image, upright Oliver image

Squirrel Rescue

Don’t mess with my legion.

I’ve shown you before that they’ve got some made squirrel-fu skills.

Now, they’ve combined that with a fierce maternal nature.

Check out this momma squirrel vs. dastardly dog encounter with a baby squirrel at stake.

Slightly Warped has the whole sequence of photos from danger to squirrel rescue.

Hat tip to Some Geek In Tennessee

Kung Fu Squirrels

Nature photographer David Slater has come across a dojo family of very aggressive squirrels in Etosha National Park, Namibia.

These members of my legion throw down with some nasty fu and fighting forms.

Metro has the full story and more Fight Club pics.

Here’s a little extra squirrel action for you. No stuffed real squirrels were harmed in the making of this video.

H/T

Otto the Unruly Octopus

Here at the Squirrel Queen’s palace, I’ve already documented how incredible the mimic octopus can be with its undersea camouflage and impersonations.

Now, I’ve come across another octopus tale that showcases how smart the eight-legged wonders can be.

It seems Otto, an octopus in an aquarium in Coburg, Germany, has kept the staff there on their toes in order to keep him entertained and out of mischief.

Otto was apparently bothered by a bright light shining into his aquarium and during the night was rising up onto the rim of its home in order to shoot a stream of water at the offending bulb. The water was short-circuiting the light and causing big electrical problems for the entire facility, endangering the aquatic life.

Staff at the aquarium spent three nights sleeping on the floor of Otto’s room before they caught the sea beast in the act of squirting and extinguishing the light.

Otto has also caused trouble for some hermit crabs with which he shares living space, apparently juggling them when bored.

For the full story, check out Otto’s tale at the Telegraph.

Image: zombie octopus at etsy

Obese Monkeys Put On Diets

When I first glanced at the pic above, I thought it was Jabba the Hut from the Star Wars movies about to leer at Princess Leia.

But NOOO.

It’s an obese monkey in a park in Japan.

The zoo keepers are putting the not so cheeky but definitely jowly primates on a diet.

It seems well-meaning visitors to the park often chuck sweets and treats over the fence into the monkeys’ area. The largest of the least likely to be swinging from a tree primates is currently at more than twice the average body weight for the species (29kg instead of 11 kg).

Maybe these monkeys were the inspiration for one of my favorite flavors of Ben & Jerry’s delightful creations.