Tag Archives: weird nature

Electric Eel vs. Alligator (Caiman)

So who would win a battle between an electric eel and an alligator?

Well, actually a smart alligator would leave an electric eel all alone.

Nature provides all sorts of defenses – poison, camouflage, big brains combined with opposable thumbs. For the eel, it’s a shock of electricity that can save its life from a predator.

Here’s visual evidence of an entanglement between the two captured by a Brazilian fisherman.

The eel’s effort was more successful than this python which tried to eat an alligator.

Photo credit for arm-raising alligator – Funny Junk

Loyal Squirrel Defends Friend From Crows

Sometimes nature is heartbreaking.

A squirrel was run over and killed by a vehicle. Its loyal friend keeps scavenger crows from attacking its corpse. This just makes me choke up a little bit.

If the video above doesn’t work, here’s a link to its page on Youtube.

There are some links to more of the squirrel’s protective nature in this post about a mother squirrel protecting her baby from a dog.

Zombie Ants


Nature has some messed up ways of keeping the Circle of Life revolving.

National Geographic has a story about female phorid flies that plant their eggs into the torsos of fire ants.

The eggs hatch, the larva feeds until it reaches the ant’s head resulting in zombie ants.

The head pops off, the new fly escapes and here we go again.

Ant brains, nom, nom, nom.

And the less-than-gentle world outside our homes keeps on keeping on.

Too bad the ants didn’t have road signs warning them of zombie activity.

Freaky Sheep

One of my readers here at the Squirrel Queen’s abode is aware of the fascination with the bizarre that causes me to post things like anatomically correct knitting and time-warped album covers.

He gave me the heads up (thanks David) and left a link on my About Page (which I highly recommend that everyone should read so they know all the pertinent info on why I tick the way I do).

David’s link directed me to one of those uncommon freaks of nature -  a five-legged lamb.

The Australian sheep has a small leg dangling from the back of its neck that should remind Newscoma of one of her all-time favorite bad movies Basket Case.

Not only does it have an extra leg, its extra leg has an extra hoof. That’s right. One sheep = five legs, six feet.

The wooly one appears to be doing fine and is just another sheep in its flock.

Here’s the visual evidence.

The Case of the High Wallabies

In Tasmania, crop circles have been puzzling farmers and government agents.

The answer to the mystery has been revealed.

It’s a case of “high as a kite” wallabies getting into government-owned fields of opium poppies, munching on the plants until they get hopped up and then wandering around in circles like the last few partiers at a rave in 2002 trampling the plants that end up in their way.

These drug-fiend marsupials apparently have more of a jones for the opium than Sherlock Holmes without a case to solve.

Tasmania is the world’s largest producer of legally grown opium for the pharmaceutical market.

Wow, maybe this self-loving kangaroo has been visiting these fields.

Humanzee – Oliver the Chimp

So the dogs woke me up at 3:45 a.m. to go out for a urinary jaunt.

Upon opening the door and getting a face full of cold air as I let them out and back in, I was immediately wide awake.

Trying to find something on the TV to knock me back out again, I watched the end of a MacGyver episode. (For the big finale, he used two silver candlesticks wrapped in bare wires to conduct electricity and defibrillated a man’s heart to bring him back to life. So what did you do at work today? Top that.)

When the mulleted magician was done, I was still wide awake. Surfing the channels, I found a show on the grid entitled “Humanzee” on the Science network. I thought to myself, that will do the trick. I’ll be conked out in 8 minutes.

Instead I was fascinated by the story of this chimpanzee brought from Africa in 1960. It turned out to act differently from all other chimps. Oliver preferred to walk upright. His cranial features were more humanoid than the average Zippy the Chimp. The animal trainers it lived with said it was capable of doing tasks and that other chimps shunned it.

Strange indeed.

At around the age of 16, Oliver’s libido took over and resulted in his being sold by his original owners, beginning an odyssey around the globe. There was talk that Oliver was a hybrid between a chimp and a human.

I still can’t believe I fell back to sleep with this animal mystery on the TV screen, but I did.

So, thanks to Youtube, I tracked down the rest of the episode in six parts.

Here is the first of the videos, so you can see why I wanted to know more.

Oliver image, MacGyver Image, upright Oliver image

Worms!

No, it’s not a fancy shrimp from a Japanese restaurant.

It’s a bone eating worm from the deep blue sea called the Osedax.

Mental Floss has 6 Weird Worms that have to be seen to be believed and details about them that make them even odder.

One Australian crawler is blue. There’s one variety called the pig butt worm because of what it resembles. Another was thought to be extinct until a few years ago.

Check out this link to a video of a ribbon worm.